Swingin' Utters

Swingin' Utters

Lost In Society, Dog Company

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$13.00 - $15.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

Swingin' Utters
Swingin' Utters
While its origin story has gone through more reboots than Batman, Superman and Spider-Man combined, punk rock has been a consistent presence on the musical landscape for more than 40 years. You might be surprised to know, however, that the Swingin’ Utters have been around for nearly as long —the band celebrated their 30th anniversary with a greatest-hits collection last year. Hell, this Bay Area street-punk band is so well-respected among their peers, there’s even a whole tribute compilation dedicated to their extensive catalog, including covers by the likes of Dropkick Murphys, Fucked Up and Teenage Bottlerocket.

Since that comp came out in 2010, the Utters have issued three more full-lengths, each more fiery than the last, and now sit on the verge of releasing their ninth proper LP. Recorded at Nu-Tune Studios in Pittsburg, California, this past March by Chris Dugan (Green Day, Iggy Pop), the album is titled Peace And Love, but don’t let that fool you: This isn’t some Haight and Ashbury hippie shit. In fact, according to guitarist/vocalist Darius Koski, Peace And Love’s content is as politically outspoken as the Utters have ever been.

“This is, by far, our absolutely most political record we’ve ever done,” Koski says. “We don’t generally write very pointedly political songs. We tend to be a little more vague and abstract. But this one is pretty pointedly disgusted and pissed off and really directly attacking these fuckin’ people in office.”

“I agree it is our most political record,” remarks singer Johnny Bonnel. “When sexism, racism and nationalism is the agenda, it’s time to speak up.” Peace And Love certainly pulls no lyrical punches — we’ll give you three guesses as to who “Yes I Hope He Dies” is about, and the first two don’t count — but the Utters also keep things interesting from a musical perspective, whether it’s the Ramones worship of “E.C.T.” (think of it as the long-gestating counterpoint to “Gimme Gimme Shock Treatment”), the surprisingly melodic, Beatles-esque “Seeds Of Satisfaction” (which Koski lovingly refers to as his “surf-goth song”) or the gorgeous, haunting closing track H.L.S., written and performed by guitarist/vocalist Jack Dalrymple and inspired by the sudden death of his former One Man Army bandmate Heiko Schrepel, who passed away in 2015. “Jack actually emailed me that song several years ago, right after Heiko died,” Koski recalls. “Immediately, I knew this is the last song on the record. My only suggestion was that it started with him acoustic, then the band joins in. You don’t really hear Jack that naked ever. That song gives me chills when I hear it.”

The rebellious spirit of the Swingin’ Utters is as present as ever on Peace And Love, although the band looks and sounds a little bit different this time around, thanks to their new rhythm section of Tony Teixeira on bass and Luke Ray on drums.
“Both Luke and Tony are stellar musicians who study their work,” says Bonnel. “Luke has amazing ability, but all his drumming is tasteful—it’s never overkill. Tony managed to come up with classic bass lines that made every song a little bit stronger.”
Koski echoes Bonnel’s praise, commenting, “We love having these new dudes in the band. Tony is a really melodic, pretty player, whereas Luke is a fucking monster. Tony and Luke are best friends, and they’ve been playing together for years in other bands like Cobra Skulls and Sciatic Nerve, so that really helps.”

It’s been four years since the Utters’ last full-length, so all three songwriters in the band had a stockpile of material when they headed into the studio. That means what you’re getting on Peace And Love is the cream of the crop.
“We usually abandon songs if we think they’re shitty or filler,” Koski admits. “I still have tons of songs; Johnny does too. But we try not to make records super-long.”

Given that the last time the Utters came off a prolonged hiatus, the band ended up cranking out three full-lengths in four years, one has to wonder if Peace And Love is going to be the start of another extended burst of creativity for these punk lifers. Koski isn’t thinking that far ahead, though. In fact, he finds it hard to even enjoy the present. Even though his band has achieved three decades and nine albums together—two feats nearly impossible for most bands—Koski wrestles with his legacy a bit.

“We just keep on going,” he says. “I’m glad we’re still doing it. Johnny’s 50; I’m in my late 40s. I don’t think anything particularly new is gonna happen—we’re not gonna be on TRL any time soon. That’s fine. It’s a total accomplishment to stay together this long, but I’m a total pessimist. I should be totally grateful—and I am! But it’s hard to be a plumber when you wanna be a full-time musician. But wah wah wah—I still get paid to travel and play my songs all over the world. I’m not a millionaire, but who cares? I get to make records, and someone out there cares about them.”
Lost In Society
Lost In Society
Combining raspy punk-rock vocals, fresh, fun lyricism, and a stage presence that will give any veteran concert-goer the chills, Lost In Society are undoubtedly the real deal. Based in the indie music hub of Asbury Park, NJ this alt/punk trio likes it loud and simple. Lost In Society got their start in 2004 with their first big show at the PNC Bank Center in Holmdel, NJ. Shortly after they would record their first EP Gone with Jon Leidersdorff of Lakehouse Music. In 2009 they hit the studio again with Leisersdorff, releasing their first full length album, Eastern Empire. This album took the sizzling hot trio to new levels, gaining them massive attention in the local music scene. It didn't take long for their catchy singles to gain a serious, die-hard fan base around the Jersey Shore. With a completely D.I.Y. dedication to promoting and touring, LIS were quickly known for collecting fans the way old punks did: by word of mouth.

Big success came in 2011, as the trio took home the gold in Metromix's state-wide BreakThru band competition. Their dedication, raw energy and fierce promotion took them to the top of New Jersey's music scene. In April 2011 LIS recorded an EP which was produced by Pete Steinkopf of the Bouncing Souls. Just this past year they've been lucky enough to share the stage with The Souls, and other legendary acts such as The Misfits, Strike Anywhere, Tim Barry and HR of Bad Brains. They also signed on with the fast growing indie punk label Altercation Records and will be releasing a split album with NY indie rockers American Pinup in February 2012.

And in recent news, LIS finally took home the award for Top Punk Band in the Asbury Music Awards. After being nominated in various categories the past 4 years, their fierce go-big-or-go-home ethos finally paid off. They're also currently nominated for Top Regional Punk Band in the TriStateIndie.com Music Awards.

2012 will be a huge year in touring as they're joining The Warped Tour for 14 dates this July.
Dog Company
Dog Company
Dog Company was formed in early 2004 with an obvious bone to pick with the status quo... Whether it be the business as usual politics of D.C., or the ever increasing mediocrity of punk rock. Ex-Staggers front man Joe and bassist Matt decided to return to their roots with the no flash, no gimmick, punchy style of punk rock that Dog Company does so well.

With the release of their first official album “Songs of Discontent” in 2008, Dog Company’s dissatisfaction with the present state of affairs is acutely displayed. With the average song coming in under two minutes and fifteen seconds, its clear that the motto of “rock ‘em in two minutes or don’t do it at all” is definitely at work.

Straight out of the gate Dog Co. not only decries against the attack on individuality and personal freedom (With songs like “Product and Demand” and “Content American”) but also sing of the unity and values they firmly believe in (with title song “Songs of Discontent”). Do not be mislead though, its not all business. With the sing along “Saturday”, Dog Co. shows they are capable of a good time.

Led by the commanding vocals of Joe Blow, and backed by the increased energy of additions Garrett, Shea, and Ron Riot; Dog Company will grab your attention from the first note to the last. In addition to playing with punk legends such as Street Dogs, The Briefs, Lower Class Brats, Vice Squad, Agnostic Front, The Business & Subhumans.
Venue Information:
Three Links
2704 Elm Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://www.threelinksdeepellum.com